Mental Health Champion of the Year

2022

SPONSORED BY
JT Global

Richard Heath, JEP deputy editor, said: ‘The Covid-19 pandemic has affected many Islanders in many different ways. ‘In the early stages of the outbreak we all feared the physical consequences of the disease, but as the pandemic grew and the lockdown began, it became clear that it was impacting greatly on the mental health of many Islanders too.’Whether it was the stresses caused by isolation, or the fear of catching Covid-19, or worries over finances or job security, we know that the events of this year have seriously affected people’s mental wellbeing.’


We also know that there are many, many people out there who have worked tirelessly to help those in need in many different ways, and we are calling on our readers to come forward and give them the recognition they deserve.


He added: ‘We are extremely grateful to JT for coming forward to sponsor this award. ‘To give Islanders time to put people forward for this and the other 13 awards we have decided to extend the nomination period for a further two weeks. I would urge Islanders not to hesitate in nominating those they believe deserve recognition – it has been an exceptional year, and there are many exceptional people who deserve to be honoured.’

Mental Health Champion of the Year

2021 FINALISTS
Mental Health
of the Year
finalists
SPONSORED BY

Andy Le Seelleur

winner

John Clark

finalist

Amy Hall

finalist

Alison Pell

Nominated by Zoie Crisp

ALISON Pell has been nominated for Mental Health Champion of the Year for her work as a nurse practitioner with Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services. Zoie Crisp, who nominated Ms Pell for the amazing work she does with Miss Crisp’s family, said: ‘Three of my four children have complex needs, including autism, ADHD, tics, and sensory processing disorder. She is amazing for our whole family. ‘Alison is always there for me if I need advice and talks me through difficult times with my children. She makes sure that I’m OK so that I can give the best care to my children. She’s always at the end of a phone or email.’ Miss Crisp explained how important Ms Pell’s work is for the Island: ‘Having complex needs in Jersey is really difficult, there aren’t always a lot of resources for us. Alison educates people on how to deal with challenging behaviour and helps people to manage and live with their complex needs.’ Miss Crisp continued: ‘Alison has 450 people in her care and yet she always has a smile on her face and care or advice to offer us. She has been paramount for my family and deserves all the recognition in the world.’

Ben Mason

Nominated by Lucy Stephenson

BEN Mason (16) has been nominated for Mental Health Champion of the Year for his fundraising campaign, which has generated more than £106,000 for local charities. Following the death of his younger sister, Kezia Mason, who took her own life at the age of 14 in March, Ben ‘decided to channel his pain and grief into something positive’. Nominated by aunt Deputy Lucy Stephenson for his ‘desperately important’ work, Ben has also raised awareness for teenage mental health in Jersey. Deputy Stephenson explained: ‘He has used his platform to talk about teenage mental health, break down barriers and reduce stigmas. He has taken part in events at school and in the community to raise awareness, while encouraging his peers to reflect on their mental health and support one another. ‘He has also supported his parents, Rob and Esther, when they have shared their story with the local and national media in order to raise awareness. ’Deputy Stephenson wants Ben’s amazing work to be recognised as he has been ‘incredibly brave’ and ‘turned a tragic experience into something useful for the wider community’. She continued: ‘He has done all of this while a teenager him-self, in his GCSE year and while grieving for Kezia. He truly is an inspiring mental-health champion and I’m incredibly proud of him.’

Focus UP

Nominated by Stephen McCrimmon

AN adult mental-health user participation group, Focus UP, has been nominated for Mental Health Champion of the Year for its ‘incredibly brave and inspirational’ work in improving the services provided to Islanders, and destigmatising mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, psychosis and bi-polar disorder. Nominated by Stephen McCrimmon, co-executive of local charity Focus On Mental Illness, the user participation group – which consists of 20 members who have been affected by severe mental illness – has been praised for being ‘incredibly brave’ and ‘improving the outcome for those diagnosed with mental illness’. Mr McCrimmon explained: ‘This is a group of completely selfless people but they have been stigmatised. They are phenomenal and feel so passionately about this cause. They do really important work that they believe is best for those with mental illness. ’He continued: ‘They have successfully campaigned to increase awareness on severe mental illness and improve services locally, as well as having provided recreational materials for Orchard House and co-producing educational material on illnesses including psychosis. They are the first to have spoken openly in the media of illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other less-talked-about illnesses. They are leaders for change and have helped to empower others whose voices were not being heard. This group of volunteers is an ex-ample of courage, determination and authenticity that I believe should be recognised.’

Dr Max Marshall

Nominated by Sara Kelly

FOR his work as a psychiatrist Max Marshall has been nominated for Mental Health Champion of the Year. Dr Marshall was nominated by Sara Kelly, who has been his patient for over two years.  

Ms Kelly commented: ‘Dr Marshall has been my psychiatrist for two and a half years now and during that time he has only ever been caring and compassionate towards myself and my mum, who is my carer. At times when I have been unwell he has been so empathetic and respectful, even when very unwell he treated me with the utmost dignity.  

‘He makes me feel involved and informed in all decisions made about me and my care and has been very honest about my care and treatment options. He is incredibly knowledgeable, which puts you at ease and you know you’re getting the best care possible.’ 

Dr Marshall has been described as going above and beyond to give his patients care that is best suited to them and as having ‘genuine’ interest in his patients’ wellbeing.  

Ms Kelly said: ‘During a change in my treatment and diagnosis, Dr Marshall created the least restrictive plan possible, explained every decision made and gave me a choice. Every appointment I go to, I feel listened to and I know he always has my best interest at heart.’

Ben Mason

Nominated by Lucy Stephenson

BEN Mason (16) has been nominated for Mental Health Champion of the Year for his fundraising campaign, which has generated more than £106,000 for local charities. Following the death of his younger sister, Kezia Mason, who took her own life at the age of 14 in March, Ben ‘decided to channel his pain and grief into something positive’. Nominated by aunt Deputy Lucy Stephenson for his ‘desperately important’ work, Ben has also raised awareness for teenage mental health in Jersey. Deputy Stephenson explained: ‘He has used his platform to talk about teenage mental health, break down barriers and reduce stigmas. He has taken part in events at school and in the community to raise awareness, while encouraging his peers to reflect on their mental health and support one another. ‘He has also supported his parents, Rob and Esther, when they have shared their story with the local and national media in order to raise awareness. ’Deputy Stephenson wants Ben’s amazing work to be recognised as he has been ‘incredibly brave’ and ‘turned a tragic experience into something useful for the wider community’. She continued: ‘He has done all of this while a teenager him-self, in his GCSE year and while grieving for Kezia. He truly is an inspiring mental-health champion and I’m incredibly proud of him.’

Focus UP

Nominated by Stephen McCrimmon

AN adult mental-health user participation group, Focus UP, has been nominated for Mental Health Champion of the Year for its ‘incredibly brave and inspirational’ work in improving the services provided to Islanders, and destigmatising mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, psychosis and bi-polar disorder. Nominated by Stephen McCrimmon, co-executive of local charity Focus On Mental Illness, the user participation group – which consists of 20 members who have been affected by severe mental illness – has been praised for being ‘incredibly brave’ and ‘improving the outcome for those diagnosed with mental illness’. Mr McCrimmon explained: ‘This is a group of completely selfless people but they have been stigmatised. They are phenomenal and feel so passionately about this cause. They do really important work that they believe is best for those with mental illness. ’He continued: ‘They have successfully campaigned to increase awareness on severe mental illness and improve services locally, as well as having provided recreational materials for Orchard House and co-producing educational material on illnesses including psychosis. They are the first to have spoken openly in the media of illnesses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and other less-talked-about illnesses. They are leaders for change and have helped to empower others whose voices were not being heard. This group of volunteers is an ex-ample of courage, determination and authenticity that I believe should be recognised.’

Mental Health Champion of the Year

Finalists